Tag Archives: ubicomp

Announcement: Sean Smith talk on April 20, 2017

The Internet of Risky Things: Trusting the
Devices That
Surround Us

Sean Smith

2 PM, Thursday, April 20, 2017
Location: IOL Training Room
Please register.

Abstract. The coming “Internet of Things (IoT)” distributes computational devices massively in almost any axis imaginable and connects them intimately to previously non-cyber aspects of human life. If we build this new Internet the way we built the current one, we are heading for trouble: the paradigms protecting the current Internet break down when devices become too long-lived, too cheap, too tightly tied to physical life, too invisible, and too many.

This talk explores risks of IoT to security, privacy, and society—and considers some ways to mitigate them.

Bio. Dr Sean Smith has been working in information security—attacks and defenses, for industry and government—since before the web. Former staff member at Los Alamos National Laboratory and designer of security architecture at IBM, he’s a Professor at Dartmouth and now directs its Institute for Security, Technology, and Society, investigating how to build trustworthy systems in the real world.

Announcement: Orit Shaer talk on March 30, 2017

Designing multi-device environments to enhance collaborative decision making

Orit Shaer

12:30 PM, Thursday, March 30, 2016
Location: IOL Training Room
Please register.

Abstract. Large multitouch displays are becoming increasingly available, offering the promise of enhancing colocated collaboration by enabling multiple users to manipulate information using natural interactions such as touch and gestures. Combining a number of multi-touch displays, large and small, facilitates the development of interactive spaces where users can move freely across tasks and working styles.

However, the availability of these exciting devices is not enough to design effective collaborative environments. We also need a deep understanding of how different design characteristics of the environment affect users’ ability to collaborate. To date, little work has examined co-located collaboration in multi-device environments that involve large-scale displays. We are leveraging infrastructure at Wellesley College, consisting of a large-scale interactive tabletop surface and data wall to investigate co-located collaboration in medium-size teams of 8, working on decision-making tasks. To gain deep understanding of individual and group behaviors while using the collaborative environment, we augment traditional measures such as completion time, performance, user satisfaction, and NASA TLX with new computational methods for objective real-time measurements that combine input from multiple eye trackers with logging of user actions.

Bio. Orit Shaer is the Class of 1966 Associate Professor of Computer Science and co-director of the Media Arts and Sciences Program at Wellesley College. She found and directs the Wellesley College Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) Lab. Her research focuses on next generation user interfaces including virtual and augmented reality, tangible, gestural, tactile, and multi touch interaction. Current projects funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and by industry grants include the design and evaluation of smart environments for collaborative decision-making, the design and evaluation of novel interactive visualizations for personal genomics, the development of computational tools for enhancing learning and innovation in bio-design, and the conceptualization and prototyping of interactive STEM exhibits for discovery museums. Shaer received her PhD and MSc in Computer Science from Tufts University. She has been a research fellow in the Design Machine Group at the University of Washington and in the University College London Interaction Center.

Dr Shaer is a recipient of several NSF and industry awards including the prestigious NSF CAREER Award, Agilent Technologies Research Award, and Google App Engine Education Award. At Wellesley she was awarded the Pinanski Prize for Excellent Teaching. Dr Shaer has served on dozens of program committees, editorial boards, and review panels, including NSF division of Computers in Science and Engineering, ACM CHI, CSCW, UIST, and TEI conferences, and the editorial board of Foundations and Trends in Human Computer Interaction. She currently serves as co-Program Chair for ACM TEI 2017. She chaired the ACM conference on Interactive Surfaces and Tabletops (2012).

2015 ubicomp course

During the fall 2015 semester Andrew Kun will be teaching a course exploring the fundamentals of ubiquitous (or pervasive) computing. The course is listed as ECE 796/896 Spc Top/Ubiquitous Computing. (It will soon be ECE 724/824.) This is the third time this course will run – the first time was in 2010.

Why ubiquitous computing?
We have entered the third era of modern computing. This era is defined by computing devices that are embedded in everyday objects and become part of everyday activities. These devices are also connected to other devices or networks in an effort to share or gather information.  Ubiquitous computing is a multidisciplinary field of study that explores the design and implementation of such embedded, networked computing devices.

The course in a nutshell
The Ubiquitous Computing Fundamentals course has two major thrusts:

1. Lectures: Lectures introducing fundamental material from papers, a textbook edited by John Krumm, and close to 40 research videos. Topics covered will include system software for supporting percom, human-computer interaction in ubicomp systems, privacy issues, context awareness, and location-based services.
2. Projects: Following a project requirements document, students (teams or individuals) will first select topics, with the guidance of the instructor. They will then prepare a proposal, complete the project, and report on it at the end of the semester through a written document and an oral presentation. Videos are encouraged.

Two past projects
Here are two videos from 2010 to give you a taste for what a ubicomp project might look like.

Video 1: Data entry using handheld computers vs. paper

Video 2: Exploring group interaction with a multi-touch table

Who is this course for?
Students who will most benefit from the course are EE, CompE, CS and IT seniors and graduate students.

Organizational details
Class will meet TR 11-12:30. There will be an open lab in Morse 213.

For grading and such see the 2015 syllabus.

Questions?
Send email to andrew DOT kun AT unh DOT edu.